Monday, May 28, 2018

The Mojoptix Sundial

No batteries, no motor, no electronics...

The Mojoptix Sundial displays the time inside its shadow, with actual digits. The shape of the sundial has been mathematically designed to only let through the right sun rays at the right time and angle. This allows to display the actual time with sunlit digits inside the sundial's shadow.


Saturday, March 31, 2018

New Study Links Social Anxiety And Fear Of Being Caught Making Mistakes by Alfredo Carpineti

http://www.iflscience.com/brain/new-study-links-social-anxiety-and-fear-of-being-caught-making-mistakes/

An international team of researchers led by the University of Maryland have looked at the potential root of childhood social anxiety and found that others noticing their mistakes could play a role. The study is published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The study gave 107 children aged 12 the flanker task, which tests their ability to focus on information while disregarding distractions. They took the test twice: once when they were told they were being observed by peers and once when they were told they weren’t being observed. The team measured reaction times in both these cases and looked at the children's brain activity using an electroencephalogram.
Based on the children's post-error response times and brain activity, the team found a connection between social anxiety and a fear of making errors when under observation.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Paper bicycle helmet wins the James Dyson Award

https://www.irishexaminer.com/examviral/technology-and-gaming/this-award-winning-paper-bike-helmet-could-save-your-life-431039.html



A rain-resistant, folding, paper bicycle helmet has won the prestigious international James Dyson Award for clever inventions.


The EcoHelmet is made from recycled paper woven into a honeycomb structure that protects the wearer’s head from impact from any direction.
It is designed for those using bike-sharing schemes who may not always carry protective headwear.
World-famous inventor Dyson praised it as an “incredibly elegant” solution to an “obvious problem”.
The prize, which is open to university level students or recent graduates, was won by design grad Isis Shiffer, of the Pratt Institute of Design in New York, who bagged a cool £30,000 for claiming top spot.
It beat a wearable asthma management system and smart contact lenses that can measure glucose levels to the award.
Isis said: “I was lucky enough to be studying at Royal College of Art and the Imperial College of London for a semester, and was granted access to Imperial’s crash lab.
“They had a European standard helmet crash set-up that allowed me to gather enough data on EcoHelmet’s proprietary honeycomb configuration to know it was viable and worth developing.”

Friday, September 30, 2016

SHOEBOX APPEAL !!!

https://www.teamhope.ie/christmas-shoebox-appeal/fill-a-box/





5 simple steps to follow

  1. Grab a Shoe boxOr a plastic container would be great! Wrap the box and lid separately with Christmas paper
  2. Print Label and choose who you want to give your Christmas Shoebox to and what age.
  3. Fill the boxGet as creative as you like and have some fun with this ! – You can use our 4 W’s as a rough guide
  4. Close the box
    • Include €4 in your leaflet envelope either on top of the gifts or taped to the inside of the lid.
    • To make it easier you can
      donate your €4 on our secure on-line site.
    • With elastic band – please don’t seal with tape as we need to check contents to comply with regulations.
  5. Drop it offTo your local drop off point closest to you
    before November 11th

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Kansas family sues mapping company for years of 'digital hell' by Olivia Solon

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/aug/09/maxmind-mapping-lawsuit-kansas-farm-ip-address

Geolocation company’s glitch sent police and angry businesses to a remote Kansas farm looking for criminals, and now the residents want compensation.



IP mapping isn’t an exact science and so MaxMind assigns a default address when it can’t identify its true location. That address just happened to be the Arnolds’ property, a remote farm that is located slap-bang in the middle of America.

More than 600 million IP addresses are associated with their farm and more than 5,000 companies are drawing information from MaxMind’s database.

It wasn’t just police who turned up on the Arnolds’ doorstep. Angry business owners would turn up claiming someone at the residence was sending their business thousands of emails and clogging their computer systems. Other people became convinced that someone living at the residence was responsible for internet scams.

A Kansas family whose remote farm was visited “countless times” by police trying to find missing people, hackers, identity fraudsters and stolen cars because of a glitch is suing the digital mapping company responsible.

James and Theresa Arnold sued MaxMind on Friday, filing a complaint in the US district court in Kansas. MaxMind, based in Massachusetts, allows companies to find out the location of the computers used by individuals to access their websites.

According to the complaint, the husband and wife team dealt with five years of “digital hell” after moving into the property in Butler County, Kansas, in 2011.

The couple had been drawn to the farm because it was close to the nursing home where Theresa’s mother was being cared for and the school that their two sons attended. The landlord also allowed the sons to hunt and fish on the surrounding 620 acres of land.

The first week after they moved in, two deputies from the Butler County sheriff’s department came to their house looking for a stolen truck, something that would happen again and again over the subsequent years.

“The plaintiffs were repeatedly awakened from their sleep or disturbed from their daily activities by local, state or federal officials looking for a runaway child or a missing person, or evidence of a computer fraud, or call of an attempted suicide,” the complaint said. At one point, James Arnold was reported for holding girls at the residence for the purpose of making child abuse films.

For half a decade the family was mystified about why this was happening until April this year when Fusion’s Kashmir Hill revealed the truth.

It all came down to glitch in the MaxMind’s IP address mapping database.

IP, or Internet Protocol, addresses are unique identifiers associated with computers or networks of computers connected to the internet. Through its GeoIP product, MaxMind matches IP addresses with their assumed geographic location, and sells that information to companies so they can use it to, for example, show targeted advertising or send someone a cease and desist letter if they are illegally downloading films

IP mapping isn’t an exact science and so MaxMind assigns a default address when it can’t identify its true location. That address just happened to be the Arnolds’ property, a remote farm that is located slap-bang in the middle of America.

More than 600 million IP addresses are associated with their farm and more than 5,000 companies are drawing information from MaxMind’s database.

It wasn’t just police who turned up on the Arnolds’ doorstep. Angry business owners would turn up claiming someone at the residence was sending their business thousands of emails and clogging their computer systems. Other people became convinced that someone living at the residence was responsible for internet scams.

More here:
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/aug/09/maxmind-mapping-lawsuit-kansas-farm-ip-address